top of page
George Washington Crossing the Delaware - by Emanuel Leutze ca. 1851
Martin Luther King, Jr. sits on a bus next to a white man
Early Lepine Paris - Fusee Pocket Watch.
Gen. William T. Sherman - Battle of Atlanta
Grand Canyon - Desert View Watchtower
Tall Wood Masked Ships Engaged in Battle
Fort Christmas - Guard Building
34 Star Antique U.S. Flag - Rare Civil War Era
McLean House - front view.
Chaco Canyon, New Mexico
Benjamin Franklin at a printing press
Chestnut Street Log Cabin - Lebanon, PA
Native American Petroglyphs
Bread and Roses Strike - Lawrence, Mass.

“Those who do not learn history are doomed to repeat it.”

This is a quote that is often used. It surely proves itself to be true over and over again as actions speak louder than words. The same mistakes that have been made for eons continually occur, and it confirms that the people who are in leadership and decision making roles are completely unaware, or ignorant, of the consequences of prior events that have been recorded throughout the annals of history.

 

This site is dedicated to preserving and keeping history alive and up-to-date and sharing as much information as possible.

Yesterday’s news is today’s history.

 

Obviously, this is a very challenging undertaking and new information is constantly being added.

 

If you would like to share information you are certainly encouraged to do so, and your contributions will be appreciated by many. Just email me at: randyjaye@gmail.com and I will add your information into this site as soon as possible.

Fort Zeller - canal and creek - ca. 1745 - Newmanstown, PA

U.S. History

No Thanks to the Rich - The Working Class Built the Nation - (Labor Movement Poster)

U.S. Labor History

Florida Territory Map of 1831 - Includes the Seminole Indian Reserve (highlighted in green) in the middle of the Florida Territory

Florida History

Helicopter operations with U.S. solgiers during the Vietnam War
American Civil War - battlefield painting

U.S. Military Wars & Conflicts

History Books Written by Randy Jaye

  Florida Prohibition: Corruption, Defiance & Tragedy

Florida Prohibition: Corruption, Defiance and Tragedy (front book cover).

Prohibition is recognized as the most unpopular law in U.S. history. It was so unpopular at the time that some Floridians weren't all too keen on obeying it. Learn how it was instigated by small town Protestants who believed that newer immigrants living in urban areas were immoral because of their emphatic use of alcohol. Prohibition bred corruption, defiance of the law, and hypocrisy as illegal bootlegging, moonshining and rum running replaced legitimate taxpaying industries. Florida actually voted state-wide Prohibition into law before the dreaded 18th amendment to the U.S. Constitution and was the only state to elect a governor from the Prohibition Party. Florida's Bill McCoy "The Real McCoy" founded Rum Row and became an international celebrity as he made a mockery of the U.S. Coast Guard's inability to squelch his innovative rum running operations. Al Capone, the infamous gangster, stayed put in his Miami, Florida home while his henchmen perpetrated the St. Valentine's Day Massacre. Many virtually unknown stories of tragic killings in Florida during Prohibition are also recounted.

Jim Crow Era Propaganda, Artifacts and Upheavals in Florida

Jim Crow Era Propaganda, Artifacts and Upheavals in Florida (front book cover).

The Jim Crow Era (1877 to 1968) has an ugly legacy of racism. Most people who did not live during the Jim Crow Era have little to no idea of its restrictive covenants, literacy tests, poll taxes, lynchings, beatings, and other oppressive features that hampered the economic, educational and political progress of Blacks and other people of color. You are invited to take a journey through the Jim Crow Era where you will learn how racial segregation became an integral part of American society, how it survived for almost 100 years, and how it was dismantled by the modern Civil Rights Movement. Many of the racial stereotypes, propaganda techniques and artifacts used to oppress Blacks and other people of color are explained and exposed. It’s time to learn about this dark chapter in American history so something like it can never happen again.

Perseverance: Episodes of Black History from the Rural South

Perseverance: Episodes of Black History from the Rural South (front book cover).

This book was inspired because many aspects of black history in many parts of the rural South are both underappreciated and under documented. Many of the local episodes of black history in this presentation occurred in Flagler County, Florida and are excellent microcosms of black history from the rural south. Journey through various episodes of black history from the rural South featuring local historical adventures weaved into broader national and international events that span from the European Invasion of the New World, the Plantation-era South, the American Civil War, Jim Crow laws, the two World Wars, the Civil Rights Movement and beyond. 

Live Programs Presented by Randy Jaye
(For Scheduling and Booking contact: randyjaye@gmail)

Florida Prohibition: Corruption, Defiance & Tragedy

An Intoxicating History of Florida’s Dry Days

Florida Prohibition: Corruption, Defiance and Tragedy (front book cover).
Moonshine still hidden in a attic in Florida during Prohibition

This live program is based on the book of the same title. It covers the Prohibition era in the United States which lasted from 1920 to 1933, spanning through the Roaring Twenties into the early years of the Great Depression. During this time the production, importation, transportation, and sale of alcoholic beverages were outlawed nation-wide, with some exceptions, of course. Learn how Prohibition was instigated by rural and small-town Protestants who believed that newer immigrants living in urban areas were immoral because of their emphatic use of alcoholic beverages. Prohibition bred corruption, defiance of the law, and hypocrisy as illegal bootlegging, moonshining and rum running replaced legitimate taxpaying industries. Florida actually voted state-wide Prohibition into law before the dreaded 18th amendment to the U.S. Constitution, and was the only state to elect a governor from the Prohibition Party. Florida’s Bill McCoy ‘The Real McCoy’ developed creative rum running technics, founded Rum Row, and became an international celebrity as he bamboozled the U.S. Coast Guard.. Al Capone, the infamous gangster, stayed put in his Miami, Florida home while his henchmen perpetrated the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre. Many virtually unknown stories of tragic killings in Florida during Prohibition are also recounted. Prohibition also helped set the stage for the rise of 20th century women’s liberation via flappers (young women who dressed in short skirts, listened and danced to jazz music, wore bobbed hair styles, drank illegal alcoholic beverages alongside men in speakeasies, and publicly flaunted contempt for what was considered socially acceptable behavior for women during this period). Many alcohol restrictions and taxation policies that still exist in Florida, and elsewhere around the nation, were influenced by Prohibition.

 Second Seminole War (1835-1842) 
     America’s Longest and Costliest Indian War

        The story begins with groups of indigenous people from Alabama
           and Georgia relocating to colonial Florida in the 18th century.

             Eventually the newcomers collectively were known as the Seminoles.

Second Seminole War (1835-1842) and its Fierce Aggression - 4 picture collage_v1.jpg
Seminoles attacking a Block House Fortress.jpg

After Florida became a U.S. territory in 1821, White settlers insisted that the Seminoles be moved onto a reservation south of what is now Ocala. When the Indian Removal Act was signed into law by President Andrew Jackson in 1830, the U.S. sought to forcefully remove the Seminoles from Florida. The Seminole people had two choices: relocation from their rightful lands or armed resistance. War broke out and there were brutal massacres on both sides.

The U.S. government perpetrated fierce aggression, trickery, bribery, and unethical warfare tactics including the capture of Seminole War leader Osceola under a white flag of truce. The campaigns of four U.S. Army generals all failed to force the Seminoles to surrender. Finally, in 1842, Colonel William Jenkins Worth declared the Second Seminole War to be over even though there was no peace treaty or surrender agreement. The result was that most of the Seminoles were forced out of Florida to a reservation in present-day Oklahoma; only about 300 remained in Florida.

General William T. Sherman’s Scorched Earth Warfare

glance into the life of one of the most controversial,

and legendary, people in American history.

“The [Confederate] people cannot be made to love us, but may be made to fear us,

and dread the passage of [Union] troops through their country.”
– Sherman’s letter to General U.S. Grant (October 4, 1862).

The mere mention of General Sherman’s name conjures up visions of fire, smoke, destruction, desolation, Atlanta in flames, plantations and farms destroyed and railroad cars and tracks smashed almost beyond recognition.

William Tecumseh Sherman - Library of Congress.jpg

This program discusses Sherman's personal life, education, participation in the Second Seminole War, his turbulent Civil War service where he rose to the rank of Major General and recovered from a nervous breakdown to lead the brutal and infamous “March to the Sea” from Atlanta to Savannah, Georgia where he used scorched earth warfare tactics to practically destroy the Confederate States of America's ability to engage in warfare.

 

Also discussed is his negotiation of Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston’s surrender (where Sherman was actually accused of being too lenient). After the Civil War he became the Commander of the Department of the Missouri (1866-1869), “Acting” Secretary of War of the United States (served approximately six weeks in 1869), Commanding General of the United States Army (1869-1884), and then he became an author and speaker in civilian life (1884-1891). Sherman died on February 14, 1891, in New York City, NY at the age of 71.

Sherman portrait - partial_crop.jpg
sherman-destroying-railroads.jpg
March to the Sea - massive destruction.png

Perseverance: Episodes of Black History from the Rural South
Many aspects of Black history in many parts of the rural South
are both underappreciated and under documented.


This program takes you on a journey through various episodes of Black history from the rural South featuring local historical adventures weaved into broader national and international events that span from the European Invasion of the New World, the Plantation-era South, the American Civil War, Jim Crow laws, the two World Wars, the Civil Rights Movement and beyond.

Perseverance-Episodes of Black History from the Rural South_FRONT Cover_1.jpg
March against Segregation - St. Johns County - ca. 1962.JPG
Jim Crow sign - Colored Only (No Whites Allowed).jpg
Jim Crow sign - We Serve White's Only.gif

Many of the local episodes of black history in this presentation occurred in Flagler County, Florida and are excellent microcosms of Black history from the rural South. Some of these historic episodes are remarkable and include Ku Klux Klan ties to the county’s founder, the “Famous Christmas Letter to Flagler’s Colored Voters” (which was a community-wide physical threat to prevent blacks from voting), a Black bootlegger killed the County Sheriff during a Prohibition raid, no high school was provided for Blacks for 32 years after the county was founded, many of the county’s elite White citizens were members of the Citizens’ Council, and the county’s school board filed one of the last and most frivolous lawsuits of the Civil Rights era as a last-ditch effort to prevent desegregation.

 

The New World provided vast land for commercial agricultural operations. Large plantations were constructed, and these operations became the largest economic industries in the New World and required vast numbers of human laborers.

 

Beginning in the late 17th century, the numbers of Native American slaves and White indentured servants dwindled and the demand for African slaves in the New World significantly increased.

 

Although Jim Crow laws (legalized racial segregation) are now outlawed, the legacy of “Jim Crow” persists as the namesake for racial segregation in the United States. Perhaps remembering the Jim Crow legacy will keep those sins in the past and remind everyone that racial segregation has no place anywhere in the world.

 

The Civil Rights movement was an organized effort by Black Americans, and some White supporters, to end racial discrimination and gain equal rights for everyone under the law. It began in the late 1940s and endured until the late 1960s.

Jim Crow Era Propaganda, Artifacts and Upheavals in Florida
Propaganda during the Jim Crow Era used racist imagery including caricatures to degrade, demonize and demoralize Blacks and other people of color, and it actually legitimized punishment and violence.

The artifacts of Jim Crow Era racist propaganda include tourist souvenirs, kitchen utensils, figurines, food containers, advertisements, signs, toys, movies (including some Disney productions), postcards and the well known Mammy caricature.

Jim Crow Era Propaganda, Artifacts and Upheavals in Florida - front book cover.jpg
Mammy - black skin - domestic servant with hands clasped caricature and multi-colored outf

This program will take you through a journey of the Jim Crow Era, which started in 1877 at the end of Reconstruction and ended in the 1960s due to the successes of the modern Civil Rights movement. Jim Crow laws were a series of state and local statutes that effectively legalized racial segregation. These laws relegated Blacks (and other people of color) to second-class citizenship. Most people of color were denied the right to vote and hold public offices and had very limited educational and employment opportunities. Florida was the least populated state in the Deep South until the mid twentieth century, but led the nation in the number of racial terror lynchings per capita. During the 1950s and 1960s, societal discontent with racial segregation led to the modern Civil Rights Movement. A number of important boycotts, protests and sit ins occurred in Florida including the Tallahassee Bus Boycott in 1956, and Jacksonville’s Ax Handle Saturday where a violent mob attacked peaceful lunch counter protesters in 1960. In 1964, during protests associated with the St. Augustine Movement the manager of the Monson Motor Lodge poured acid in the lodge’s pool because several Blacks were in the water. This deplorable incident reached international news.

Rural Life in Florida - Pelican with 4 black caricature children - Historic Florida Jim Cr
Free Lunch in the Jungle - Black boy caught by alligator - Historic Jim Crow era Postcard

Fun With History - People and Facts that are Mostly Unknown or Forgotten

Incredible Recent History Stories "In the News"

Explore the Fascinating History of Clocks and Watches

Gilbert - 1880s Mantle - Res Swirl - Ful

CLOCKS: Some of the earliest clocks (water clocks, hourglasses and sundials) have existed within human civilizations for thousands of years. The mechanical clock became a very important necessity during the Industrial Revolution and played a key role in the development of the modern world. Many stories and pictures of various types of clocks are included in this website.

Mortima - World Timer - Super Auto - Wristwatch Full front view

WATCHES: During the 15th century in Europe, watches evolved from portable spring driven clocks. In the 17th century, pocket watches became the first mobile timepiece and remained in common use for over 400 years. During the World War 1 era, the more miniaturized and convenient wristwatch came into fashion and became the timepiece of choice for men and women. Wristwatches have evolved into various shapes and styles, and have incorporated advancing technology to expand their features and capabilities. Many stories and pictures of various types of watches are included in this website.

bottom of page